Tag Archives: community

Wednesday Worksheet #3: Analyzing your Locavore-ability

18 Sep

In a new move for this blog, we’ve come up with four printable worksheets, which we’ll post on Wednesdays this month.  We all need a little back-to-school type fun this month, right?  So download, print and enjoy!  If you feel so inclined, snap a photo of yourself and your worksheet and share with us on Facebook and Twitter!  Make sure you tag, tag, tag!

locavore tags

This third worksheet challenges you to identify characteristics of an entity you’d like to make more local-food-and-farming friendly.  Could be your household, your group of friends, or even your own self.  A Strength-Weakness-Opportunity-Threat analysis is a classic way for any group to get a quick picture of their situation, and we highly encourage you to try it out and share with others.  It’s hard to TAKE ACTION if you haven’t brainstormed some of the main characteristics you’ll encounter within your locavore challenge.

Download week 3’s worksheet here: Activity Week 3 LC 2013

Week 2’s worksheet (creating your Locavore mission statement): Activity Week 2 LC 2013

Week 1’s worksheet (planning our your Locavore strategy): Activity Week 1 LC 2013

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Gathering Around a Locavore Table: Tips for the best food event you can throw!

13 Sep

Today’s post is from Annie Levay-Krausse, writer of The Land of Peapodriot, a blog “Focused on seasonally, organically, locally and ethically sourced dishes; this blog is interspersed with posts on gardening, seed saving, soap making and Food Ethics.” She’s also the founder of SOLE of Buffalo, “a burgeoning food movement that connects people with Seasonal, Organic, Local and Ethical resources and information.”  She’s sharing her wealth of experience in planning great food-based events with us today.  These are the hot locavore tips, folks!

Congratulations! You took on NOFA-NY’s Locavore Challenge and are so excited about it that you’re planning a local food get-together.  Maybe it’s one of the Harvest Dinners–and you think you have a great chance at winning one of the prizes–maybe it’s a community event, a potluck, or an extra-special meal you’re planning on hosting for friends (like that all-one-ingredient party mentioned in Sunday’s Long Read).  Local food lovers are all starting to talk about these events and so should you!  They give you the opportunity to connect with a community of people who come from all walks of life but agree that food should be experiential and exciting and engaging and local.

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If you are eager to host an event this September, take the time to plan. It doesn’t have to cost you anything, but it will take time and patience to do it well. There are so many ways to make your event a success. These ten tips are ones I’ve developed over the last 12 years of hosting my International Dinners and a couple end-of-challenge potlucks, and will help eliminate the majority of your headaches, whether your party is four or one hundred and four.

  • Location: Pick a location that can handle changeable weather. It’s the end of September and New York is known for anything and everything weather. Snow squalls, thundershowers, 90 degrees and sultry, windy and icy cold? We’ve seen weather that can make your toes curl, and wouldn’t you know? It always seems to make an appearance just as your party gets started. So choose a place where you and your guests can dine in comfort. If it’s not your home, make sure you get permission and secure it on a calendar. A tailgater and potluck and baby shower happening in one location? Yes, and I’ve been there because I didn’t plan ahead. If it’s in a park, you will need a permit, which are inexpensive and very easy to secure.
  • Invitations: Paper invitations are quite lovely, but also consider your audience and the way you’re gathering information.  Either follow up with an e-mail or send an online invitation to start off.  This is an easy way to keep track of the head count. If you’re hosting a potluck, have the guests indicate which dish they’ll be bringing. This is a great way for both you and your guests to see what is being offered and what is still needed. It’s also a fantastic way of quickly answering questions, offering suggestions, and often can include a map and directions.
  • Food safety: Food can spoil fast. Consider chafers for hot foods and ice for cold foods. If you’re hosting a potluck, encourage your guests to bring dishes that do not need either. Otherwise, make sure you have enough space set aside in your kitchen, an oven or microwave, and plenty of refrigerator space.
  • Prep Ahead: Encourage your guests to prepare their dishes before they arrive so you don’t have to worry about providing cooking space.
  • Sharing: Have each of your guests bring enough of a dish for at least eight servings.  Request that they write a label with the name of the food and its ingredients so be set up with the food.  This is also a great way to have people display local-food pride!  They can label when something is a generations-old recipe, or when the main ingredients are organic and local!  Ask guests to bring more side dishes than desserts, and be sure at least one of the guests brings a salad.  For smaller parties, not everyone needs to bring a filling food.  Some extra-special pickles, condiments or sauces that complement the other dishes are quite welcome, and ensure that people leave feeling (slightly) less over-full.
  • Setting Up: Get an estimate at least three days before the party. Plan to rent, borrow, or ask guests to bring a few extra chairs and maybe even tables for your larger gatherings.
locavore spread staff inservice

Getting set up at a recent NOFA-NY staff potluck. A collection of dishes that we could serve at room temperature, and our collection of serving utensils at the end. We also boiled a big pot of water and enjoyed corn on the cob fresh from a staff member’s organic farm!

  • Serving and Layout: You can bet most of your guests will not remember to bring a serving spoon to go with their dish, I almost never remember and I’m always asking the host. Keep extras on hand. Organize the food layout with a definite beginning and ending. Set the plates, napkins and utensils at one end of the table near the food, so guests know where to line up. Start with the main dishes, then sides, then breads, and finally desserts. I recommend keeping beverages and glasses on a separate table.  If possible, set up a traffic flow that allows people to move down both sides of a table and still access the majority of foods.  If you’re serving a sit-down meal or a more intimate gathering, maybe keep a table to the side where extra dishes are to be kept.

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  • Glassware, Plates, and Silverware: Consider biodegradable and recyclable. Don’t forget you will need napkins, plates, spoons and forks. Guests tend to fill up whatever size plate they have, be it small or large. Go with a smaller plate (8 to 9 inches) so guests don’t overfill and waste food. They can always go back for seconds if they are hungry for more. [Editor’s two cents: We have a set of real plates that we use for NOFA-NY monthly staff potlucks and the occasional field day where we’ll serve food.  Our collection is entirely from thrift stores, which usually have very good prices on lightweight but durable sets of dishes and cutlery.  This is a worthwhile small investment for anyone who wants to regularly host meals, no last-minute trip to the store for biodegradable plates, which are probably more expensive than second-hand dishes after a few parties.  Cloth napkins also add an element of luxury to a meal, but that really depends on the size of your party.]SAMSUNG
  • Beverages and ice chests: So many others would ask their guests to bring a beverage along with their dish, but I can assure you, that’s a nightmare! Unless that’s their offering to the event, be sure to have water, teas, coffee on hand, and plenty of ice. All the other “stuff” can be an extra bonus. You do not want to have nothing but Kool-Aid like drinks because everyone left their organic ice tea or juices they made on their kitchen counter at home.
  • Cleanup: No one wants to clean up after a party, much less a big dinner, but it’s just as important as the prep was. Have plenty of trashcans and recycling bins available during the event, and plan some time at the end of the event to allow for cleanup. Make it a group effort. The fastest “cleaner-upper” could earn a prize of some sort, besides your adoration. [Editor’s tip: If someone is a last-minute guest or someone you know won’t have time to bring an edible contribution, they’ll probably welcome the chance to contribute by being the clean-up captain]

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Editor’s Ideas: While filling bellies is the main activity at an event like this, and though conversations will naturally flow once people sit together, don’t waste the potential of your event to really get people talking and building great locavore-positive moments.  Since this week’s theme is all about sharing stories, making friends and building community, perhaps you’ll think about a way to have people engage around locavorism at your event.  

  • As the host, make sure you introduce people with similar interests or roles within the food world.
  • Have some conversation-starters ready in case you need to break the ice.
  • Think of a quick introduction activity (could be as simple as having extra-large nametags and asking people to write their name AND their favorite September local food).
  • Print out some Locavore Challenge worksheets or interesting short articles on our food system and place them on tables, just in case people need a prop to start conversation.
  • Set up a photo-taking spot with some props and a backdrop (a bedsheet or some streamers will do).  Or do like Think Local Geneseo is doing with a laminated sign and dry-erase markers, where people write why they’re locavores.

Enjoy your Locavore party!  Thanks for being an example of local eating in your community!

Wednesday Worksheet #2: Spread the Word!

11 Sep

In a new move for this blog, we’ve come up with four printable worksheets, which we’ll post on Wednesdays this month.  We all need a little back-to-school type fun this month, right?  So download, print and enjoy!  If you feel so inclined, snap a photo of yourself and your worksheet and share with us on Facebook and Twitter!  Make sure you tag, tag, tag!

locavore tags

This week we are providing you with a worksheet that is very near to our hearts at NOFA-NY.  As we are constantly interacting with people who are new to our organization, we’ve learned the value of concise messaging about the our mission, vision and any program we run.  Similarly, you’ll be able to talk with confidence about the Locavore Challenge if you’ve crafted sort of an elevator pitch to explain why you just refused the boxed (and not from a source you’re including in your local-foods diet) cookies at your staff meeting.

Week 2 Worksheet: Activity Week 2 LC 2013

Missed week 1? That’s this worksheet: Activity Week 1 LC 2013

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Week 2 Theme: Sharing Stories, Making Friends via Local Organic Food

9 Sep

TOTW: Sharing Stories, Making Friends via Local Organic Food

Welcome to week two, Locavores!  This week is about being able to be bold and outspoken about your Locavore Challenge.  It’s about sharing!

How do we use food to connect with our situations, our surroundings, other people, and our internal selves?  How do we build community through our locavore activities?  For example, how can you get more people excited about your harvest dinner because it’s locally sourced, and not just because it’s a meal they were invited to?  There’s little more instinctive than food–eating seasonally and from the surrounding area is a time-tested way to tune into your surroundings and to connect with those who share your space, from your kitchen table to your farmers market.  Talk up what you’re doing to everyone around you, and share something awesome you’ve made (or simply cut up and put salt and pepper on), and see where it takes you.

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sharing is as sweet as a local, ripe peach

locavore tags

Reach Out: Your #Locavore Friends are Waiting!

8 Sep

As we begin week 2 of the Locavore challenge, we’re thinking of the ways that food brings us together.  Most shared meals have this effect, but consider how eating locally offers the chance to make friendships, build new bonds, and keep your community and environment a place to live well.  Perhaps you don’t count farmers as regular dinner guests (but invite them, they may really appreciate someone cooking for them after a day of harvesting winter squash), but going out to a farmers market, buying their food, then treating it with interest and eating it with appreciation all go into building community with local food.  Imagine if nobody did that–what would happen to the farmer, the farmland, and your surroundings?  Now, imagine a brighter future.  What would happen if everyone who went to the farmers market convinced ONE friend, co-worker, or acquaintance to meet them at the farmers market.  How many more farmers would be supported?  How much more food would be available?  How much stronger would the local economy be?  (If you’re interested in some studies on the impact of small local farms, including how they tend to purchase more of their inputs from local sources, check out studies from the Dyson School of Agriculture Economics and Marketing at Cornell and the Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems).

local-ingredient cornbread (made with honey and butter, not sugar and oil) and garden-to-table vegetable soup

local-ingredient cornbread (made with honey and butter, not sugar and oil) and garden-to-table vegetable soup

So, what happened in week one?  We saw a big uptick in blog visitors, some action on Facebook and Twitter.  One Twitter user, Amy Reinink, tweeted us photos her yogurt-in-progress.

She even strained it to make it Greek-style and posted about the challenge on her blog!  Way to go, Amy!

Our summer intern Maddy (you’ll read a post from her in a few weeks) has been working to engage community and bringing them to action through Think Local Geneseo.  Here some reasons those people gave why they’re taking the Locavore Challenge:

“I care about local farmers and their families”

“It tastes better”

“Factory farming is wasteful”

“I trust local produce”

“It makes sense”

See all the great reasons on their Facebook photo album.

Many locavores spent a few days last week sharing in traditional foods and activities of Rosh Hashanah.  They were brought into community through shared symbols, faith and for those who saw the connection, through local food-sharing.  It was indeed possible to have a very sweet Locavore Rosh Hashanah, with local apples and honey representing the sweetness anticipated for the new year.  We loved reading blogger Leah’s latest post at Noshing Confessions.  What inspiration, as usual, on good food and making the most of the seasonal bounty in the context of age-old traditions.

Some of us have families that give us instant community, and we can share the locavore challenge with them.  Sarah Raymond, Membership and Development Coordinator, is going through her first Locavore Challenge with NOFA-NY.  Here’s how her first week went:

“This September, as part of my Locavore Challenge, I plan to bring more dialogue into and emphasis on our food activities as a family.  As the month rolls on, I will help my kids keep their own Locavore journals, full of drawings, photographs, recipes we used together, stickers, stories, and most likely, a few smudged food marks. I think it can turn out to be a nice little family tradition every September. We began this week by going to our local farmer’s market. The kids picked out some peaches and blueberries to savor and share while exploring the market. Sure enough, not long after the first few bites, a group of kids had congregated together, each investigating and sharing each other’s food, with their parent’s approval of course. That’s one of the great things about food, it brings people together. For my kids, I want them to know that sharing healthy food is a way to show others their love and respect for them. In toddler terms, we like to give people healthy foods to eat because we care about them and want them be healthy so they can have fun.”

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Others among staff were impressed that a few words spoken to some fairly new friends (“I’m eating local foods as much as possible this month”) had a noticeable impact on those friends’ food-buying habits.  At a recent Labor Day dinner, the hosts were very excited to tell Rachel, Beginning Farmer Coordinator, that the tomatoes were from HER farmer (one she’d pointed out to them upon a chance encounter at the Brighton Farmer’s Market).  Everyone at the party agreed they were some of the meatiest, most delicious tomatoes they’d ever tasted.  True, when someone hears you’re trying to eat mostly local foods this month, you may have to convince them why you think it’s important (it may not be an instant sell).  But if you talk about the challenge in the right way, you can indeed effect change.   More on that later this week! Wednesday’s worksheet will help you come up with a Locavore Sales Pitch, so start thinking about why you are taking the challenge so you can tell others about it.

Let’s end this rumination turning the locavore challenge into a community-builer with some kitchen ideas that take a spin on one of our classic locavore activities.  That activity, appropriate to Grandparent’s Day (today), is to interview a relative about a food tradition.  That’s always a fun one, as some of our past blog posts show.  Decades ago, locavore eating was the only eating, and our grandparents (or great-great-grandparents) might not think of this challenge as anything but normal.  That’s where traditional foods and regional cuisine comes from–what used to be the best things to eat in that place and time.  If you’re low on inspiration from traditions, culture or passed-down recipes, try to make some new ones to repeat.  First think, “What are my local foods?  What’s available (farm-fresh) to cook with today?”  Work backwards to find a recipe that uses that food.  We have plenty of ideas collected on Pinterest.

One more crazy idea (and if you e-mail us a picture, we might just post it here next week) to share with friends and family.  Pick one ingredient.  A fruit or vegetable will be easiest.  Obtain a lot of it (perhaps in various varieties, from different farmers).  Then make a feast out of it.  Don’t just cook one dish with it.  See how many different ways you can play with that one ingredient.  Chances are that next year, whomever you invited to your Broccoli Brunch, your Carrot Circus, your Pepper Potluck Party, your Eggplant Eating Extravaganza, your Tomato Tournament or your Zucchini Zone will want to join in the fun again!  Voila! A Locavore tradition!  Try a variety of dishes, some cold, some hot, some raw, some not, to marvel over that one ingredient’s flavor and texture in all its forms.

lots of kinds of zucchini to test out!

Zucchini "Carpaccio"

raw zucchini salad (Martha Stewart)

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grilled zucchini and tomato salad (the kitchn)

zucchini ricotta galette (smitten kitchen)

zucchini ricotta galette (smitten kitchen)

ugly and therefore tasty zucchini chips

zucchini parmesan chips (smitten kitchen)

Pickle Recipe

quick zucchini pickle on toast with cheese (101 cookbooks)

zucchini ice cream (flavor of italy)

Buying Clubs: The New Old Way to Shop Local

6 Sep

Miriam Goldberg writes in today to explain how the company she co-founded, Wholeshare (also a sponsor of the Locavore Challenge), helps consumers through the shift to organic and local food buying.  Even more, she explains a little about her story and why she is committed to the work of Wholeshare.  Read to the end for an exciting discount that Wholeshare is offering to you this month, which also helps raise funds for NOFA-NY!  We’re fortunate to have this company in our locavore community.

When I first joined a buying club in Providence, Rhode Island, I was new to the concept of group shopping. I’d belonged to CSA‘s in the past and was sold on eating locally and sustainably. But after a few seasons of buying just my fresh produce straight from farmers, I was intrigued by the full-pantry option presented by the buying club. The club was a tight-knit community that shared my values of eating real food at affordable prices.

In Brisben, the Path of Life groups prepares for their Wholeshare pick-up.

In Brisben, the Path of Life groups prepares for their Wholeshare pick-up.

Weekly grocery pick-ups through the buying club were bustling and social, where members caught up on the week’s news and shared kitchen tips. And as I watched my refrigerator fill with fresh local produce and cabinets overflow with bulk grains, beans, and granola, I knew I was making a good choice for my diet as well as my wallet. I couldn’t believe I had shopped alone at the grocery store for so long!

Organic, locally-sourced, and affordable produce in the middle of Brooklyn - yes, please!

Organic, locally-sourced, and affordable produce in the middle of Brooklyn – yes, please!

Soon, though, I realized that I was lucky to have access to a buying club. There are buying clubs in every state, but not nearly enough of them. I wanted to find a way to facilitate the creation of supportive, healthy communities like what I’d found in Providence. So my co-founders and I decided to launch Wholeshare. Through Wholeshare’s online interface, communities can easily purchase local food together at lower prices. As the company grows, we’re lucky enough to connect hundreds of eaters with their local farmers and producers.

When we were looking for a place to launch Wholeshare, New York was an obvious answer. New York is one of the most productive agricultural states in the country. Its $4.5 billion farm economy produces hundreds of delicious foods, from wine to kale to beef. And New Yorkers love good food. Here’s just a few numbers to demonstrate the state’s big appetite (numbers are from Wholeshare):

• 1,000: the number of certified organic farms in New York State
• 23%: amount of New York State that is farmland
• 370: number of organic dairies in New York State
• $2.3 billion: amount of money generated by New York’s milk industry, the state’s largest agricultural commodity
• 521: the number of farmers markets in New York State as of August 2012.

As we learned from these impressive stats and from the success Wholeshare has seen, food is important to New Yorkers. And so is eating local – for instance, the number of farmer’s markets in 2012 represents a 121% increase from 2000. At Wholeshare, we know that New Yorkers want to eat food that was grown nearby and sustainably. So we partner with dozens of New York State producers to provide a wide catalogue of healthy, organic foods. Check out the map below to see just a handful of the farms and processors that provide us with Certified Organic and Farmer’s Pledge products through Wholeshare!


Wholeshare makes it easy to buy food with your community from local sources. We believe in reducing the distance between you and your farmer, and in lowering the economic and geographic barriers to great-tasting, sustainable, healthy food. Each group on Wholeshare shops together to get the best prices and selection. So if you’re hosting a Locavore Challenge Dinner, try buying your ingredients on Wholeshare! Once you start a group, it’s easy to place your first order just in time for the local food celebration. Plus, you can invite your dinner guests to join your Wholeshare group. This will help get the word out about your dinner and forge bonds that will last long after dessert is finished.

Of course, one of the main goals of the Locavore Challenge Dinner is to raise funds for NOFA-NY. We can help you with that, too. When you start a group on Wholeshare, we’ll donate 5% of your first order to NOFA-NY on behalf of your Locavore Challenge Dinner.

To learn more about Wholeshare and sign up, visit http://www.wholeshare.com/start/nofa.

In the moment

13 Sep

Do you not drink the local milk in your fridge because “that’s for yogurt”?

Do you look at a beautiful basket of CSA tomatoes and sigh because “canning gets so stressful”?

Essentially, do you forget to enjoy the now-ness of seasonal, local eating because you’ve been at it so long that you’ve formed (admittedly well-intentioned) food preservation habits that override the spirit of Locavorism?

If so, you might be me.

That’s why I love being on NOFA-NY staff during the Locavore Challenge.  It’s a lot of work, on our end, to be present at events, publish daily e-mails, remember to post sponsor information on the website, mail out calendars and materials to our generous (and patient) regional partners and helpers.  But it’s so fun to get to see all the new people discovering delicious local foods.  It’s like they’ve been let into a secret club (though obviously our goal is to make it a very un-secret club).  It’s a club I’ve been in a long time, and the newbies remind me about my first bite of a fresh farm tomato.

Have I ever told that story?  If you follow this blog, you’d assume I was always queen of the tomato-eaters.  I was only crowned such about 5 years ago.  I was working on my friend’s farm and I thought I didn’t like tomatoes.  I was 22.  My dad had grown tomatoes (his thing was the yellow pear tomatoes) in our garden, as I’m sure my grandfather had as well.  Yet I never liked them fresh (cooked, sure).  But something about that first-adult-tomato-still-warm-from-the-sun combined with a heck of a lot of not-wanting-to-offend-my-friend-and-employer had me hooked.  I LOVE tomatoes.  Even after picking them in hot plastic high tunnels til I turned yellow-green with sap…I loved them since that summer.

So why am I lately more stressed than happy over an abundance of tomatoes (no offense to my CSA farmers, who are totally rocking it this year)?  It’s because I have, on occasion, forgotten to actually just eat them.  Not eat whatever’s left over from canning.  Not eat because they’ll go bad (they will).  Just eat because I now love tomatoes.  A lot of this is my personality–I tend to want to postpone my enjoyment or finishing something until just the right time.  I don’t want the season, happiness, etc. to end.  Generally, I like this policy.  I eat divine local food year-round (though less during certain months).  But that survival mentality can be problematic if I don’t keep it in check.  I ought not worry so much if I have one less jar of preserved tomatoes this winter, or if I don’t buy extra greens to freeze.  I’m still an okay person doing my best to eat local!  It’s not as if I’ve abandoned eating local by putting a little less food away…I doubt I’ll be relying on fast food or anything like THAT this winter.

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My furry friend says, “No canning tonight, Rachel! Stay out of this pantry and go enjoy life!”

Some people might say “carpe diem.”  We locavores might say “carpe solanum lycopersicum.”  A favorite poet of mine would say “you only have to let the soft animal of your body love what it loves.”  In any case, this is my thank you for giving new-to-you local, seasonal foods a try and showing your enthusiasm for the Locavore Challenge.  This afternoon I barely bought anything at the farmer’s market–I just went to say hi and get a few salad-bound items.  I love the market because it’s full of newbies and old hands with local eating.  We all come there and form this funky community through a common desire to know our farmers and eat the freshest food we can (and that wasn’t intended to be clever, but I guess I do mean eating the freshest food possible, tonight; but also, preserving the fresh food through canning and eating it later).  I tasted some heirloom tomatoes from a friend/farmer’s table and grinned at the guy tasting next to me, who was trying very hard to remember which sample corresponded to which tomato, testing them all multiple times to decide which he’d buy.  My guess is he’d only buy one or two tomatoes, but take them home and truly savor them.  He might try to get a spouse or child to taste one, and he might be successful.  But in that moment, he was enjoying what seemed a new thing for him, all those colors of glittery goodness on the end of toothpicks. He inspired me.  Instead of feeling like a loser for not buying a bulk quantity of something to put away for winter, I made a different play: I indulged in locally-made ice cream with my food dollars, and saved the rest of that for another day’s canning, pickling or drying adventures.  Today was about today.  I enjoyed every luscious lick of that ice cream, it was truly the perfect mid-fall hot afternoon treat. Tonight I’m canning nothing, but I’ll be drinking an ice-cold glass of tomato juice from what I have here at home–not enough to make sauce or salsa, but just right for juice.  Or I might make gazpacho.  It doesn’t matter, it’s going to be simple, it’s going to rock my world and there won’t be anything but a memory come January!

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